Looking for cunning cocktails for weddings in Italy? Wine spritzers are a no-brainer – although you should know there are two different mixes, Aperol and Campari.  Aperol is a little sweeter and light orange, while Campari is ruby red and slightly bitter.  But Italy makes other signature drinks that are just as cool 😎

Amalfi Coast Wedding Cocktails

Limoncello is one of the most sought-after liqueurs in Italy. Typically a lady’s after dinner drink, make it ‘manly’ mixed with vodka, mint, and honey – all ingredients (except vodka) found fresh and local on the Amalfi Coast.
Here’s how to make a refreshing vodka-mint lemonade that Marisa and Todd baptized as the ‘Ludden Limonata? at their wedding in Sorrento:
4 limes or lemons quartered and any seeds removed
Leaves from 1 medium sized bunch of mint
8 cups of cold water
½ – ¾ cup honey or sugar more or less to taste
8 to 16 ounces vodka about 1 to 2 cups, more or less to taste
Ice cubes
Lime or lemon slices to garnish
Instructions
Place the quartered limes or lemons in the blender with 2 cups of water, sugar or honey, some ice, and half of the mint leaves.
Blend until the limes or lemons are crushed, the mixture should be slightly foamy with a whitish color.
Strain the lemonade and add the remaining 6 cups of water.
Stir in the vodka or allow guests to add the vodka according to their preference
Serve with ice and garnished with the remaining mint leaves and lime slices.

A shot of Espresso

Everyone knows that Naples, Italy makes two things best: pizza and espresso.  Add some spunk to your neapolitan espresso coffee with an Espresso martini, a sophisticated cocktail with vodka, kahlua and some sugar syrup added to a single or double shot of strong Italian blends like Illy or Kimbo, or a classy Nespresso – what else?
Here’s the mix:
5cl vodka
.5cl sugar syrup
1cl Kahlua
1 espresso
Instructions
Pour into shaker with ice, shake, filter into iced martini glasses, garnish with coffee beans.

Italiano or Americano?

Negroni tells a story all its own.  Supposedly first concocted in Florence in 1919 as Orson Welles describes it: “The bitters are excellent for your liver, the gin is bad for you. They balance each other.”  Bitters include gin, vermouth and Campari, served in an old fashioned on the rocks with a slice of orange.
The Americano cocktail, strangely enough, is more Italiano.  It is similar to the Negroni minus the gin (so only Italian bitters) plus soda water and a slice of lemon instead of orange.

Wine Spritzers

Wine spritzers became trendy in the 90s in the Italian Alps of all places, where it became the preferred cocktail for upscale skiers.  The superb prosecco produced just south of popular ski resorts like Cortina and Sestriere is colored with Aperol and bubbles with soda water.  Some purists prefer white wine instead of prosecco and for an extra punch, sweet Aperol is substituted with a more bitter Campari.
Never mistake a Hugo for a Spritz! Prosecco, melissa syrup, soda water, and a few mint leaves, garnish with lemon.
To toast in Italian you say ‘Salute!’ or ‘Cin Cin’ (pronounced chin, chin)